News Articles


Towards a Cell Cycle Atlas

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The cell cycle is a fundamental process over which the cell grows and divides. This highly regulated series of events is known to be an important contributor to variations in protein and RNA expression between individual cells. Today we are releasing version 20.1 of the Human Protein Atlas (HPA), adding new data to the Cell Atlas, which allows detailed exploration of protein and RNA expression in relation to cell cycle progression...Read more


Movie of the month: Early steps in development of breast cancer

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In this movie, some characteristics of breast cancer is demonstrated using light sheet microscopy. The technique allows for visualizing structural alterations in breast cancer compared to normal breast...Read more


Movie of the month: the inner ear

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An important part of the human body is the inner ear responsible for both hearing and balance...Read more


Facets of individual-specific health signatures

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Facets of individual-specific health signatures determined from longitudinal plasma proteome profilingProteins that circulate in human blood can provide important information about health or disease states of an individual. To gain insight into personal baselines and how protein levels vary over time, researchers within the HPA have studied the plasma proteomes of clinically healthy individuals during one year...Read more


A 20-year journey with the Human Protein Atlas

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Today, an open access booklet "The Human Protein Atlas - a 20-year journey into the body" is published in collaboration with the American Association for Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the journal Science. In addition, a "microsite" is launched combining facts about the Human Protein Atlas with 3D-based videos of the human body and diseases...Read more


Upcoming Events


FEBS Practical and Lecture Course

May 30, 2021 - June 4, 2021

FEBS Practical and Lecture Course - A summer school aimed at graduate students, post-docs, and young independent investigators who want to learn about new techniques to explore the proteins encoded by the human genome.

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